Archaeology at the University of Hawai'i

Excavating in Kohala
Archaeology is the study of ancient humans through the material culture - the physical traces of the past - that persist today. Archaeology at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa draws upon the world's rich archaeological record to provide training for both undergraduates (B.A.) and graduate students (M.A., Ph.D.), while advancing archaeological knowledge and scholarship (primarily concentrated in Oceania and East and Southeast Asia) through active programs of fieldwork and research.



Programs of archaeological research within the Department continue to enjoy support from both federal and private sources. Over the last several years, Mānoa-based projects of faculty and graduate students alike have received support from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanitites, The Luce Foundation, and others. Additionally, the Department is well known for facilitating archaeological field schools for undergraduates and graduates from around the globe who take interest in this part of the world.

Faculty

Excavating in Cambodia
James M. Bayman, PhD 
Archaeology, craft production, political economy; North America, US Southwest <jbayman@hawaii.edu

Christian E Peterson, PhD
Archaeology, comparative study, early complex societies, regional settlement patterns, household archaeology, quantitative methods; China <cepeter@hawaii.edu>

Barry V. Rolett, PhD 
Archaeology; Pacific Islands, Southeast China <rolett@hawaii.edu

Miriam T. Stark, PhD 
Archaeology, ecology, early village economics, ceramics, ethnoarchaeology; Southeast Asia <miriams@hawaii.edu

Archaeology Labs Manager

Jo Lynn Gunness

Additional Graduate Faculty

Melinda S. Allen ( PhD, U of Auckland)
Prehistory of Oceania, evolutionary, ecological, and biogeographical theory, zooarchaeology, human paleoecology, subsistence change, prehistoric environments, exchange and interaction, Polynesian fishing technologies; Oceania, Polynesia <msallen@auckland.ac.nz>

S. Jane Allen (PhD, Intl Arch Res Inst)
Soils and environmental archaeology, Contact-era archaeology; Southeast Asia, Pacific Islands; <jallen@iarii.org>

J. Stephen Athens (PhD, Intl Arch Res Inst) 
Evolutionary and agricultural ecology, epistemology of science, archaeology of South America, Micronesia and Hawai'i <athens@hawaii.edu>

Christine Beaule (PhD, Lecturer)
Arch, household archaeology, early complex societies; Latin America (Andes), mortuary studies, research methods and science writing; Bolivia <beaule@hawaii.edu>

R. Alexander Bentley, (PhD, Durham University, UK)
Bioarchaeology, popular culture change, Neolithic transition, isotope analysis, evolutionary theory; mainland Southeast Asia, central Europe, contemporary Western society <r.a.bentley@durham.ac.uk>

C. Kehaunani Cachola-Abad (PhD, Kamehameha Schools)
Archaeology, oral traditions, historic preservation, evolution; Hawaii and Polynesia <keabad@ksbe.edu>

William Chapman (PhD, American Studies) 
Historic preservation, historical archaeology, history of anthropology <wchapman@hawaii.edu

Sara Collins (PhD, Pacific Consulting Services, Inc.)
Archaeology, Human & Faunal Osteology, Historic Preservation Compliance & Practice; Hawai`i & the Pacific <scollins@lava.net>

Thomas S. Dye (PhD, T.S. Dye & Colleagues, Archaeologists, Inc.)
Archaeology; Hawaii & the Pacific <tsd@tsdye.com>

Tianlong Jiao (PhD, Bishop Museum) 
Transition from hunting-gathering to farming, maritime adaptation, complex society, early state formation, China, southeast Asia <tjiao@bishopmuseum.org>

Jennifer Kahn (Ph.D., Bishop Museum)
Archaeology, lithic technology, household archaeology, monumental architecture and landscapes; Hawai‘i, French Polynesia, and the Pacific. <jennifer.kahn@bishopmuseum.org>

Thegn Ladefoged (PhD, University of Auckland)
Archaeology, evolution, landscape, social complexity, agricultural development, remote sensing, GIS; Polynesia <t.ladefoged@auckland.ac.nz>

Peter R. Mills (PhD, University of Hawai'i, Hilo)
archaeology, culture contact, lithic analysis, ethnohistory; Polynesia, North Pacific, North America <millsp@hawaii.edu>

John A. Peterson (PhD, Micronesian Area Research Center)
Archaeology, historical archaeology; Hawaii-Pacific, Philippines, American Southwest <johnap@hawaii.edu>

Jay Silverstein (PhD, The Pennsylvania State University)
Archaeology; militarism; the evolution, rise and fall of complex societies; hydraulic constructions; GIS; survey; modern military archaeology in Asia and Europe; urban archaeology; Mesoamerica; and Greco-Roman Egypt <drjsilverstein@gmail.com>

Douglas Yen (DSc, Professor Emeritus, Australian National University)
Origins of Pacific agriculture, plant domestication, archaeobotany, application of biological techniques to problems of cultivated plant dispersal; Pacific Regions <dougyen@yahoo.com>

Emeritus

Michael W. Graves, PhD
Archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, evolution of social complexity, quantitative analysis; U.S. Southwest, Oceania <mwgraves@unm.edu>   

P. Bion Griffin, PhD 
archaeology and ethnology of hunter-gatherers, ethnoarchaeology, technology; Southeast Asia, Philippines <griffin@hawaii.edu

Wilhelm G. Solheim II, PhD
archaeology, prehistory of Southeast Asia and its relationships with that of Korea and Japan

Archaeology at UH Mānoa

Click on these links to learn more about Asian Archaeology and Physical Anthropology or Southeast Asian archaeology at the University of Hawai'i-Mānoa

Students are generally incorporated within both field and laboratory research contexts. Theoretical approaches represented among the archaeologists in both research and teaching include evolutionary and ecological theory, as well as interests in processual and analytical perspectives. There is strong commitment in the archaeology program at UH Mānoa to linking method and theory to field and laboratory analyses in order to contribute to the development of prehistory and history throughout Asia and the Pacific.

Given the location of Hawai'i, the archaeology program emphasizes research and instruction for Hawai'i, the Pacific, and Asia (especially Southeast Asia) as well as other parts of the United States, e.g., the American Southwest. There are on-going field research projects directed by faculty members in Cambodia, the Mariana Islands, the Marquesas, Hawai'i Island, and Kaua'i, and archaeologists in the Department have worked recently throughout most of the remaining Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Lana'i, Kaho'olawe, O'ahu, and Necker), the Society Islands, Fiji, Samoa, Melanesia, the Molucca Islands, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Thailand.

Students generally find opportunities to enjoy both field and laboratory research experiences. Theoretical approaches represented among the archaeologists in both research and teaching include evolutionary and ecological theory, as well as interests in processual and analytical perspectives. There is strong commitment in the archaeology program at UH Mānoa to linking method and theory to field and laboratory analyses in order to contribute to the development of prehistory and history throughout Asia and the Pacific.

The archaeology program has a laboratory equipped for paleo-environmental and geoarchaeological research and there is access at UH Mānoa to laboratories for geochemical, isotopic, and geographic information systems research. We have ties with and access to resources at the Bishop Museum, the Central Identification Laboratory-Hawai'i, and the State Historic Preservation Office. A number of archaeologists from these institutions along with researchers working for private contract companies, the military, and state and federal organizations work with the program, serve on student committees, and teach at the University.

Linked Sites

Archaeology for the Public
Bernice P. Bishop Museum
Society for Hawaiian Archaeology
American Studies Historic Preservation Program
Maritime Archaeology and History
State Historic Preservation Division
FAQ about a Career in Archaeology in the USA